Metro

Here are some of the Veterans Day commemorations in Greater Boston

jessica rinaldi/globe staff/file 2014

To the veterans we know, Nov. 11 is a time for reflection of their past life in the military, while enjoying some recognition for having served. It means a lot more than parades and discounts or free admission to attractions — although there are certainly more of these tributes nowadays to the 380,000 veterans in Massachusetts and millions more across the country. They are all over Greater Boston, all happening on Monday. Here’s a small sampling:

Parades: The annual Boston Veterans Day Parade starts at Boylston and Charles streets at noon and will proceed up Boylston Street to Tremont Street and end at City Hall Plaza. Visit www.boston.gov/events.

The Marlborough Veterans Day Parade begins at 10 a.m., with participants meeting at 9:30 a.m. in front of the American Legion on Maple Street. The parade will proceed on Main Street and stop at memorials along the way, ending at the World War I Memorial (aka “The Doughboy Monument”). Visit www.marlborough-ma.gov.

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In Marshfield, the local Veterans Council and town Veterans’ Services hold a ceremony and march beginning at Library Plaza at 10:30 a.m. The march will pause at the Town Green at Town Hall before proceeding on Route 139 to Veterans Memorial Park for the ceremony at 11 a.m. Visit www.marshfield-ma.gov.

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In Whitman, residents of three towns — Abington, Rockland, and Whitman — are invited to attend the 66th annual Tri-Town Veterans Day Parade beginning at 10 a.m. on South Avenue at Colebrook Boulevard, and ending at the Whitman VFW at 95 Essex St. Expect to see police, fire, and veterans groups from the towns, as well as local color guards, school groups, youth groups, town officials, marching bands, floats, antique cars, fire engines, and horses. Visit www.jgpr.net/2019/11/07/whitman.

Freebies: Both the Franklin Park Zoo, 1 Franklin Park Road, Boston, and Stone Zoo, 149 Pond St., Stoneham, are offering free admission to veterans from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Guests must show military identification, and tickets should be purchased at admission booths, not online. Visit www.zoonewengland.org.

The Braintree Municipal Golf Course, 101 Jefferson St., has a free round of golf and lesson for veterans. Book ahead at www.braintreegolf.com to play, and contact PGA head golf professional Craig Coombes at 781-843-6513, ext. 4, or ccoombes@braintreema.gov to book a free lesson between 2 and 4 p.m.

A couple other happenings we’re noting this week:

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There’s a “Lynn City Summit” on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. during which residents and business owners will have the floor to share thoughts on issues facing the community, including transportation, arts and culture, economic development, housing, public health and safety, and education. Organized by the mayor’s office, City Council, Metropolitan Area Planning Council, and the Impact Lynn and Lynn Business Partnership groups, the event will be held at North Shore Community College’s Lynn campus, 300 Broad St. Visit www.ci.lynn.ma.us.

Also on Saturday, Gloucester is hosting one of those increasingly common sessions we see in Eastern Massachusetts cities and towns these days: how to increase housing and make it affordable. The “Gloucester Housing: From Crisis to Opportunity” symposium, presented by the Gloucester Meetinghouse Foundation, will be held from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Gloucester Meetinghouse, 10 Church St. Expect participants from government, nonprofits, the arts, and local business representing a broad range of views, as well as individuals sharing stories about their housing experiences. Visit www.gloucestermeetinghouse.org.

And the Fuller Craft Museum, 455 Oak St., Brockton, hosts “Crafting Dissent 2020” from 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday, celebrating the power of craft as a change agent and political tool. The event includes a book launch, a workshop, a trunk show, and a reception for the exhibit “Stitch by Stitch: Activist Quilts from the Social Justice Sewing Academy” consisting of work by young artists confronting pressing issues in their lives and communities. The 14 quilts, highlighting both craft activism and the current state of fiber art across the country, will be displayed through Jan. 19. Visit www.fullercraft.org.

L. Kim Tan can be reached at tan@globe.com.